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Archive for the ‘Loaves’ Category

Ho-hoo! Guess who came to visit me – a whole family of pigs!
Here’s a family portrait;

And another;

And don’t tell the rest.. ..but I think I ate one of ’em!

Oink-oink!

Marika~

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It’s time I moved on from plain white flour and used something different for a change – and so, here’s the result – a wholemeal bread!

This recipe comes from a book from Richard Bertinet called Dough, but well.. of course I made some little variations and so here is how I did it.

Note! Pictures of the process are displayed at the “Gallery” -page

Dough, makes two little wholemeal breads (almost 100% wholemeal)

The sponge

3g                   Fresh yeast

150g              Water (measured to 23°C, flour being 22°C => 22,5°C dough)

150g              100% wholemeal wheat flour

100g              100% white leaven, been refreshed couple times during the past days

Dissolve the yeast into the water and combine with the wholemeal flour. Add the white leaven and cover the bowl properly with a kitchen towel. Let it stand 3-4 hours, ’till nice and bubbly.

Dough

403g              Sponge from above

5g                   Fresh yeast

100g              Water (also 23°C)

250g              100% wholemeal wheat flour

10g                 Fine sea salt

1. Weight out the flour and salt. Measure the water to the right temperature and mix the yeast in. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix well, ’till there are no dry bits.

2. Knead the dough in various ways. I tried this kind of folding-kneading as descriped in the book, but the dough being so dry it didn’t quite work. Then I did about 30 kneads and somekind of stretching, finally ending up with a ball of dough. Place this ball into a lightly floured bowl and let it rest for 15 minutes.

2. Now divide the dough into two equals pieces. Weighting helps in this, mine were about 375g each. Then shape them into balls. I first did 7 kneads (according to the link above), then gently pulled the dough from the sides with my palm into the middle, repeating this a few times, too. Finally I turned the dough around and whiped most of the flour away from the table. Then placed my both hands behind the dough,  kneeling down a bit and pulling the dough towards me. The dough should be just enough sticky to roll a bit over itself. Repeated this a few times – not too many or it tears. Then let the balls rest under a kitchen towel for another 15 minutes.

3. Prepare your bannetons with flour – kitchen towel and a bowl do make a good mold. 

4. Then shape your breads. Flatten the ball down a bit, and roll a third of it into the middle. Then turn the other side into the middle too and tuck it gently down. Now place your hands behind the dough and turn it over from the middle.  As you pull the dough towards you press your thumbs inside of it, turning the ball into a longer bread. Incase your bread is still too chubby, you can gently roll it around with your palms. Then tuck the ends of the bread a bit inside and on the bottom side zipper the bread by squeezing it together with your fingers. Place into your banneton the seam-side up, cover with kitchen towel, shape the other bread and let them rest for an hour.

5. Turn your oven on to 250 °C. Place an oven tray or baking stone to warm up, too.

6. Then bake your breads. If you have no bread spatula, take take tray out and cover it with baking paper. Flip the breads on the tray, remove the extra-flour from the top of the breads and then from the tray with a brush. Then slash-decorate the breads with a sharp knife or a razor. Let them bake in 250°C for 15 minutes, and then another 15 minutes in 210°C.

7. Take your breads out and let ’em cool down on a rack. Wholemeal makes a good breakfast bread, filling your tummy with fiber and giving you something to chew on.

Marika~

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Krhm – so now I had the right hydration leaven, also 56,3% – or at least closer to that than to a 100% hydration one. One can really see the difference between these two, huh? Well, at least I saw a huge difference in that, how well everything worked out this time – compared to the last Unlucky bread. So here is what one needs to make a good sourdough bread – also no commercial yeast needed;

Note! More pictures of the process are displayed on the Gallery-page and the terms are explained on the Dictionary- page.

Dough, makes two long or one round sourdough breads

370g              Sourdough 56,3% (refresh it according to the Unlucky breads link above)

370g              All-purpose white flour (I use 12% protein)

278g              Water

11g               Fine sea salt

Extra Virgin olive oil

Semolina

1. Weight out all the ingredients. The required dough temperature is 19-20°C.

2. Mix the water well together with the flour. Then add the leaven and work it hard, until it’s combined. Leave for 10 minutes.

3. Add salt, knead the first time and leave for another 10 minutes.

4. Second knead and further 10 minutes of rest.

5. Third knead and then you may leave it for an hour.

6. Then on an oiled tray do your first fold. Let the dough rest another 40 minutes.

7. If making two breads, divide the dough now. Use scale to make them equal, so that they both bake as fast. Then form the dough into a ball(s) and let it rest for another 15 minutes on the table covered by the bowl. Note: More detailed about this same process (parts 7 and 8 ) can be found from the White bread with overnight sponge II – parts 8-10.

8. Shape your bread. Then place into a heavily floured banneton, tuck the banneton into a plastic bag and place it into the fridge for 12-24 hours.

9. The next day put your oven to heat up to 250°C. Then wake up the sourdough breads by removing the plastic bags around them. Let them sit in the room temperature in their molds covered by kitchen towel for another 30 minutes.

10. Place them into the oven (don’t forget to slash). For help check now the parts 11-12 from the White bread with overnight sponge II. After 10 minutes reduce the heat to 210°C. Then keep baking for another 20 minutes.

11. Let ’em cool down and enjoy ❤

Ps. Later I’ll update more detailed info about how to shape and bake your bread nicely!

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So, having presented this lovely fluffy bread last time, I shall now give you some different filling options for it. You can tuck almost anything in your focaccia as long as it’s enough small and thus goes deep in the dough. If it pops up, it might burn and give the whole bread a yucky taste. I haven’t tried all the following fillings out yet, but I’m rather convinced they’d work, too.

Salty foccaccias

Crushed garlic soaked in olive oil

Olives – with stone or not

Little cubes of meatballs or ham

Feta cheese cubes – preferably oiled too

Blackpepper, oregano, basilicum… on the top

Sweet focaccias

I love sweet focaccias – and to make them even better it’s important to pour some sugar-syrup on the top. You make this by quickly boiling a random amount of sugar together with random amount of water. After the focaccia is done (and it’s very important that it really is done, since if you put it back into the oven the lovely sugar-syrup will burn on the top), you pour couple big spoons of this transparent liquid on top of the bread. Let the whole thing cool down and mmm, it’s so delicious… …and yes, a bit sticky, too.

Small grapes or cherries (haven’t tried cherries – could work or not)

Pieces of anykind of dark chocolate – the one meant for baking might give the best result though

Baking vanilla sauce

Sugar-vanilla sugar-soft butter mixture, mmm… could be delicious – as long as it doesn’t burn

Coconut in some form

Crushed cardamom, fennel on top or e.g. lemon in the sugar-syrup

Just try everything – focaccia is so big bread that you can fit something in one corner and other stuff in the other, to try out new flavours! Oh, and tell me if you find something fabulous, or if you figure out that something doesn’t work out at all!

Marika~

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Now, finally bread with real bubbles!

Note! Pictures of the process are displayed at the “Gallery” -page

Dough, enough to make one fluffy focaccia

200g              Sourdough 100% (been fed couple times during the past days)

500g              All-purpose white flour (I use 12% protein)

362g              Water

4g                 Ground malt powder

8g                 Fresh yeast

30g               Extra Virgin olive oil

11g               Fine sea salt

40+10g        Extra Virgin olive oil

Semolina

Finger salt

1. Begin by measuring the flour, fresh yeast, malt powder, salt and leaven in separate cups. Measure the water in the required temperature of 21-25 °C (See; White bread with overnight sponge II).

2. Dissolve the fresh yeast and malt powder to the water. Mix this together with the leaven.

3. Then combine this mixture well together with the flour untill there is no dry parts. Squeeze it trough your fingers to make sure there are no flour-lumps. Scrape the edges down. Let it rest for 10 minutes.

4. Now pour the salt on the top of the dough. Then do your first knead (See; Dictionary page), 30 kneads ought to be good. Let it rest for 10 minutes.

5. Second knead and another 10 minutes of rest.

6. Measure 40g of olive oil into a box with lid. Then oil the box properly by turning it around and with the help of your hand. Then do your third knead and place the dough in the lidded box for an hour.

7. Do your first fold (See; Dictionary page) on an oiled tray. Always when folding or stretching work with oiled hands. Put the dough back into the box and let it proof for 40 minutes.

8. Second fold and back into the box for another 40 minutes.

9. Third and last fold. Then another 40 minutes of proofing in the box.

10. Turn your oven on to 210 °C. Place an oven tray to warm up, too.

11. Place a baking paper on top of another tray or cutting board, somewhere where it’s easy to slide it off from. Then sprinkle it lightly with semolina. And while waiting you can also pluck off your rosemary leaves ready for later.

12. Once the proofing time is over, lift the dough up on the baking paper. Let the bottom edge first hit the middle of the paper. Then let the dough fall a bit towards you and finally fold the upper edge over the rest, so that it reminds “a ball”. Let it rest for 10 minutes.

13. Then gently stretch the dough by placing your fingers underneath it. Keep your fingers straight and do not grab the dough – this is important, so that you don’t damage the bubbles we’ve worked so hard for. Do not over do it – a bit is enough, then let it rest for another 10 minutes.

(14. Stretch a bit more if needed. It’s enough that the dough is evenly on a tray, and pretty much covers it. Then let it rest for another 10 minutes.)

15. Stretch the dough a little bit more and dimple it with your fingers (the more dimples, the more rosemary fits in). Then insert rosemary, sprinkle finger salt on top and gently pour some olive oil there, too.

15. Pull the baking paper with the focaccia on top on to the hot oven tray. Let it bake for 5 minutes in 210°C and then lower the heat to 190°C. Bake for about 30 minutes more, ’till the focaccia is lovely golden brown.

16. Let it cool down well on a rack. Cut open and see the, oh so lovely, bubbles!

Marika~

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The morning sun of the day when you get to eat gorgeous bread has risen, and well – you better be ready to see some touble then. The total baking time of this bread – I mean the hours of work you need to do today – will be closer to four and a half. That means – the sooner we start, the earlier we are done.

Note! Pictures of the process are displayed at the “Gallery” -page

Dough, enough to make one bread

91g               Sponge (made the day before, no need to measure)

200g              Strong white flour (I use 12% protein)

143g               Water (About 18°C – the detailed water temperature counting method will be presented later though it can also be seen in one of the “Gallery” pics)

3,5g               Fresh yeast

5,5g               Fine sea salt

1. Begin by measuring everything in cups and bowls and yes, a good scale is indeed needed.

2. Dissolve the fresh yeast to the water and pour some of this to the bowl where the sponge is. Mixing these two together will help you to remove all of the sponge from the bowl.

3. Then combine these two well together with the flour untill there is no dry parts. Squeeze it trough your fingers to make sure there are no flour-lumps. Scrape the edges down. Let it rest for 10 minutes.

4. Now pour the salt on the top of the dough. Then do your first knead. This happens by gently holding the dough from the middle with your left hand and with your right thumb and forefinger grab the dough on the edge and place it in the middle. This is gentle work – no need to stretch the dough or squeeze it (unless you find drybits). Repeat 24 times and turn the dough around in the end (pretty side up). If the top is torn, do less kneading the next time. Let it rest for 10 minutes.

5. Turn the dough around (pretty side down), do your second knead, turn it around again (pretty side up) and another 10 minutes of rest.

6. Turn, third knead, turn and another 10 minutes of rest.

7. Turn, fourth knead and turn. Now you can cover the dough with a kitchen towel and then leave it to work for an hour.

8. Dust the table with a little bit of flour and place your dough on top of it (pretty side down).  Then knead it like you’ve done before, but this time instead of 24 repeat it only 7 times. This kneading will help you to get rid of some extra-air inside. Then turn the pretty side up again. After this, whipe most of the flour away from the table and place your both hands behind the dough. Kneel down slightly and pull the dough towards you. The dough should be just enough sticky to roll a bit over itself. Repeat a few times – not too many or it will tear. Place the baking bowl on top and let it rest for another 15 minutes.

9. On the mean time, we can prepare the “banneton”. Having no real banneton, I make mine out of a breadmold and a kitchen towel. Place a clean kitchen towel into a bread mold. Fold it first couple times so that it just reaches a bit over the edges of the mold. Keep the “decorated” side inside (because at least in mine, the flour sticks better to the backside). Tuck the towel down and dust it well with the flour. Whipe the cloth a bit with your hand to make sure the flour sticks well – use rather too much flour than too few.

10. Now shape your bread. Place your hands behind the dough again, but this time let your thumbs rest on the front. At the same as you pull the dough towards you press your thumbs inside of it, turning the ball into a longer bread. If one time doesn’t do the trick, you can repeat it – but after that it should be enough long. Then tuck the ends of the bread a bit inside and on the bottom side zipper the bread by squeezing it together with your fingers. Place into your banneton the seam-side up. Cover with a towel and leave for another hour.

11. At this point you can also get your oven to heat up to 250°C. Place an oven tray inside of it to pre-warm it up at the same.

12. When your dough and oven are ready, take one tray out and cover it with bakingpaper. Flip the bread on the tray, remove the extra-flour from the top of the bread and then from the tray with a brush. Then slash-decorate the bread with a sharp knife or a razor. Let it bake in 250°C for 12 minutes.

13. Lower the heat into 210°C and let the bread keep baking for another 20 minutes.

14. When done, remove the tray and the bread from the oven. Let the bread cool down on a grate – if you wait enough long so that the bread is cool, the cutting edge will be a lot prettier, too~

Huh – well, hope you enjoyed it ’cause more recipes will be coming up as soon as your leaven is ready for them. I will also later on present you my kneading and shaping methods. Also some presentation of the tools I use might be needed too.. Well, but now – let’s keep baking, yay!

Marika~

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It is baking time – woohoo! But ok, a warning is needed now – you’ll only get this bread tomorrow. And another warning – there won’t be anything left of it after tomorrow.

But, today you’ll get to make the sponge and here is what one needs;

Overnight sponge

50g               Strong white flour (I use 12% protein)

40g               Water (cool)

1g               Fresh yeast

So, doing a little math you can see this sponge is for example 80% hydration – the amount of water is only 80% of the amount of flour, so it will be a bit more dry mixture. And this now is a sponge, not a sourdough ‘since a sourdough never has any commercial yeast in it.

To begin with, make sure you first dissolve the yeast well into a needed amount of water. After that you can mix the flour in with a spatula, scrape the edges down and cling film/close the lid of the jar. You ought to leave it in a cool place for overnight, but fridge could already be a bit too cold. The required temperature depends alot on whether you’ll be baking in the morning or in the evening – the warmer the sponge spends the time in, the faster it becomes active and also the faster it starts loosing it’s bubbles. But I’m sure you’ll find a good place for it.

The rest of this secret recipe and the amazing baking methods shall show up tomorrow then – that might be a bit longer update with so much info coming up, huh!

Marika~

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